Car PartsDodge PartsDodge Ball Joint

Dodge Ball Joint

The Dodge ball joints are the steering part that makes it possible for the wheel to turn side to side. There are two, an upper and lower on each of the front wheels on most Dodge cars. The ball joints life span is determined by how often the owner of the Dodge has them greased. This periodic maintenance should occur during a routine engine oil change. The biggest mistake most technicians do when performing this simple task is not to elevate the car off the ground and suspend the wheels. With weight on the ball joints, the grease will not enter the entire joint. All weight must be removed from the Dodge ball joint for the grease to cover the entire joint. A "roll-on" lift raises a car by means of two tracks under the wheels. This will leave the weight on the wheels and does not permit this simple task of greasing the steering part correctly. The idler arm, pitman and tie rods should also be greased (wherever applicable) at this time. If the ball joints are permitted to wear, then the steering on your Dodge will be adversely affected. Once this wear becomes too sever, replacement of this steering part is required for your vehicle to be safe when traveling down the road. A car owner can test the wear on their ball joint by lifting the car off of the pavement. With stands or blocks under the vehicle the top and bottom of the wheel should be grasped and attempted to move in and out. If any play inward or outwards is felt, an inspection by an experienced technician is highly advisable and replacement of this steering component will more than likely be the end result.