Car PartsFord PartsFord Ball Joint

Ford Ball Joint

Ford ball joints have been used on vehicles from this automaker for decades now. This is the pivot point in which the spindle swivels and makes it possible for your vehicle to turn. On each front wheel of a Ford there is a lower (and sometimes an upper) ball joint. To help the Ford ball joint last as long as possible grease has to be injected into this joint at regular intervals. If this is not done and done correctly, this weight bearing part will wear prematurely which will require them to be replaced. The periodical greasing of the ball joints should be performed when the engine oil is changed. The other steering components should also be lubricated at this time. The problem today is that most quick oil change facilities use a roll up lift in which your Ford's wheels are still in contact with a surface and weight is still on them. Because of this weight on the ball joint, the grease being injected into them can not cover the entire part; the weight of the vehicle is preventing it. For the entire part to be greased properly, the car's wheels must be lifted off the ground. To know if your ball joints are worn, the driver might notice play in the steering wheel when cornering or driving in a straight line. To test these parts, the wheel has to be lifted. By grasping the top and bottom of the wheel the play in this part can accurately be felt. The danger of these parts being worn is that in time they can come out of their socket when your Ford is traveling down the road causing the spindle to lose contact with the A frame. This will cause you to have only three wheels on the ground and a tow truck will have to be called.