Car PartsLincoln PartsLincoln Disc Brake Pads

Lincoln Disc Brake Pads

The ability of the Lincoln Disc Brake Pads to create friction without destroying the rotors or themselves can be attributed to the composite material they are made from. The material made into disc brake pads is just a little softer than the solid metal rotors and are comprises of carbon fiber and asbestos to name two of the components used in their construction that is used on your Lincoln.

When the disc brake pads make contact with the rotor, the friction created also generates heat. This causes the material that the pads are composed of to turn to dust. The amount of dust and wear of the pads is determined by the contact area it has with the rotors. The smoother and thicker the rotors on your Lincoln are, the amount of wear on the disc brake pads is minimized.

The force behind the pushing of the Lincoln disc brake pads against the rotors is from the brake calipers. The piston in the caliper converts the hydraulic pressure to mechanical force and pushes the pads against the rotors stopping the vehicle. As the pads wear, the amount of travel the piston has to make increases. This requires that some of the brake fluid from the master cylinder's reservoir on your Lincoln to be transferred to the caliper. When the pads are near their limit on being worn, the amount of fluid in the reservoir is minimal. Because of this, the checking of the fluid level in the brake master cylinder is a good indication on the amount of disc brake pads that remain on your vehicle. When it appears more fluid should be added to the reservoir, it is time for a new set of pads to be placed in your braking system.